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Our friend, Peter Ashlock, is on NY Times. Pointing out the truths about Uber and its gig-economy.

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ippei
1201 Driver Rider Guru
 Posted 10 months ago

Our friend, Peter, was on the New York Times last week.  

Mr. Ashlock, who will be 71 next week, has racked up more than 25,000 trips as an Uber driver since 2012. His Nissan Altima has 218,000 miles on it — nearly the distance to the moon. His passengers rate him 4.93 out of five stars. His favorite review: “Dude drove like a cabdriver.”

While he is an integral part of Uber’s success, Mr. Ashlock is barely getting by. His 2018 tax return will show an adjusted gross income in the neighborhood of $40,000, better than 2016 and 2017. But he has maxed out his $3,200 credit limit at the local Midas car-repair shop and needs to come up with $5,000 to pay his taxes. He has Social Security but no savings to buy a new car that will let him keep working.

Silicon Valley has always been a lottery where immense wealth is secured by a few while everyone else must hope for better luck some other time. Rarely, however, has the disparity been on such stark display as with Uber. Its stock market value is expected to be about $100 billion, which would make it one of the richest Silicon Valley public offerings of all time.

He points out the truths about the gig-economy. 

Mr. Ashlock illustrates the hollow promise of the so-called gig economy, which billed itself as being superior to the usual manager-employee relationship. It promised to harness the power of technology to liberate the struggling millions.

Being an Uber driver, by contrast, was “sustainable and profitable,” the company said. Drivers were described as entrepreneurs with a median income of $74,000 in San Francisco and $90,000 in New York. A Denver cabby who switched to Uber was quoted:...

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Our friend, Peter, was on the New York Times last week.  

Mr. Ashlock, who will be 71 next week, has racked up more than 25,000 trips as an Uber driver since 2012. His Nissan Altima has 218,000 miles on it — nearly the distance to the moon. His passengers rate him 4.93 out of five stars. His favorite review: “Dude drove like a cabdriver.”

While he is an integral part of Uber’s success, Mr. Ashlock is barely getting by. His 2018 tax return will show an adjusted gross income in the neighborhood of $40,000, better than 2016 and 2017. But he has maxed out his $3,200 credit limit at the local Midas car-repair shop and needs to come up with $5,000 to pay his taxes. He has Social Security but no savings to buy a new car that will let him keep working.

Silicon Valley has always been a lottery where immense wealth is secured by a few while everyone else must hope for better luck some other time. Rarely, however, has the disparity been on such stark display as with Uber. Its stock market value is expected to be about $100 billion, which would make it one of the richest Silicon Valley public offerings of all time.

He points out the truths about the gig-economy. 

Mr. Ashlock illustrates the hollow promise of the so-called gig economy, which billed itself as being superior to the usual manager-employee relationship. It promised to harness the power of technology to liberate the struggling millions.

Being an Uber driver, by contrast, was “sustainable and profitable,” the company said. Drivers were described as entrepreneurs with a median income of $74,000 in San Francisco and $90,000 in New York. A Denver cabby who switched to Uber was quoted: “I feel emancipated.”

The Federal Trade Commission found the claims to be false advertising, and the company agreed to a $20 million settlement.

He posts with us 

Is it true that Uber once claimed, "Lower Rates, Higher Pay" to the drivers when they lowered the fare price?

Peter Ashlock's Comments and Posts


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