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The on-demand moving and delivery Survival Guide

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AstonDE
94 Rider Driver
 Posted 1 year, 4 months ago

Customer, Rider, Driver, or Provider, this is the simple survival guide to the gig-economy!

As a Customer:

1. Know Exactly what you need moved: If it’s a couch, then it’s a couch. Not a couch and “maybe” a lamp, or an extra item or two. This helps your mover or driver understand what exactly they need to help you complete your move. It also eliminates any confusion or ambiguity during your delivery. No driver or mover likes surprises.

2. Fill out any questionnaires completely: Include as much details as possible. If there is a narrow stairway, include it in the description. If there are multiple floors, or there is no service elevator, include it in your notes. Drivers appreciate information that helps them respond and prepare to fulfill your request.

3. Include Pictures: A picture is worth a thousand words! When drivers see pictures, they respond more favorably. Most orders without pictures either receive a high prices response, or few to no responses at all. It also helps ensure the right drivers with the right vehicles and tools respond to your order.

4. Name a Fair Price: No one is going to move a chair 25 miles for $20! Name a price that you would want to be paid if roles were reversed. Drivers rarely respond to orders with unrealistic pricing expectation.

5. Leave Reviews: The On-Demand ecosystem is a meritocracy and based on feedback. This protects the integrity of the community, and ensures an equitable, fair, and transparent service ecosystem.


As a Driver

1. Respond ONLY to Jobs you can perform: Don’t respond to a job you don’t have the vehicle, time, or tools to complete. Taking on jobs you are not able to perform sa...

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Customer, Rider, Driver, or Provider, this is the simple survival guide to the gig-economy!

As a Customer:

1. Know Exactly what you need moved: If it’s a couch, then it’s a couch. Not a couch and “maybe” a lamp, or an extra item or two. This helps your mover or driver understand what exactly they need to help you complete your move. It also eliminates any confusion or ambiguity during your delivery. No driver or mover likes surprises.

2. Fill out any questionnaires completely: Include as much details as possible. If there is a narrow stairway, include it in the description. If there are multiple floors, or there is no service elevator, include it in your notes. Drivers appreciate information that helps them respond and prepare to fulfill your request.

3. Include Pictures: A picture is worth a thousand words! When drivers see pictures, they respond more favorably. Most orders without pictures either receive a high prices response, or few to no responses at all. It also helps ensure the right drivers with the right vehicles and tools respond to your order.

4. Name a Fair Price: No one is going to move a chair 25 miles for $20! Name a price that you would want to be paid if roles were reversed. Drivers rarely respond to orders with unrealistic pricing expectation.

5. Leave Reviews: The On-Demand ecosystem is a meritocracy and based on feedback. This protects the integrity of the community, and ensures an equitable, fair, and transparent service ecosystem.


As a Driver

1. Respond ONLY to Jobs you can perform: Don’t respond to a job you don’t have the vehicle, time, or tools to complete. Taking on jobs you are not able to perform satisfactorily only leads to negative reviews, or in some cases dismissal from the on-demand platform. Tread carefully! Customers expect you to deliver. No customer likes surprises.

2. Read all job postings ENTIRELY: Ignoring details and customer information creates miscommunication, this leads to surprises, this leads to a poor customer experience. This leads to negative reviews, which means less jobs won. When you pay attention to details, you are better prepared, and your customer is happy. Happy customers mean happy drivers. Everybody wins!

3. Pay attention to the Pictures: A picture is worth a thousand words! Nuff said!

4. Name a Fair Price: This gets tricky, but as a Driver, you generally know what you would charge to complete a delivery. No one is going to move a chair 25 miles for $20! Name a price that you would want to be paid, and cover any expenses while making a healthy margin.

5. Leave Reviews: Reviews are super important! This is your lifeblood, this is why some drivers win every response, and some don’t. The On-Demand ecosystem is a meritocracy and based on feedback. This protects the integrity of the community, and ensures an equitable, fair, and transparent service ecosystem.

On-demand moving and delivery apps help you move stuff from point to point. Including junk removal, and labor help packing and loading. The gig-economy has transformed this experience by connecting those with a need to move items, with local drivers who are able to help. The “Lyft for delivery” ecosystem is growing fast. 2019 should see a proliferation of these platforms. Exercise caution, good judgment, and stay engaged!

Cheers!

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Comments

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    KimberlysWorld
    26
     1 year ago

    It took me until 75% into this article that this isn't about food delivery.  When I hear the word, "delivery", I immediately think "food."

    Then I start seeing it mention things like lamps and taking a picture before requesting.  I was like, "huh? Why would I take a picture of my food?" LOL.

    Show Hide  3 Replies
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      AliCommons
      32 Rider
       1 year ago

      Me too.  Where it says, "fill out the questionnaire", I was like, "oh, of course. I love when the site lets you customize my paninis!"

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      AstonDE
      OP 94 Rider Driver
       1 year ago

      Perhaps your subconscious is telling you it's time to eat something? 😀 

        {{ ratingSum }}
        KimberlysWorld
        26
         1 year ago

        Or maybe it’s telling me I really should move from my current crappy apartment.