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Did you know? Orange lights on the hoods of taxicabs are called "Trouble Light"

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StevenL-NYU
141 Driver Driver
 Posted 2 years ago

Hey, passengers.  Have you seen these orange circular lights on taxi cabs?  They are usually on the back of the trunk, but sometimes also on the front by the radiator.

Have you seen one lit and flashing?  I hope not, because if it is, it means the taxi driver needs help!

Those lights are called "trouble light" and sometimes "emergency light" or "amber light".   It is a visual distress signal to alert the authorities that the driver is in danger, say being attacked or being robbed.  It is activated by the driver with a switch, and it is a silent alarm.  If you see one, make sure to call the police!

Hey Uber drivers! 

Maybe you should be installing it too.  I assume the authorities will come to your aid.  Very affordable and easy to install.

https://www.taxidepot.com/taxiproducts/trouble-light-security-system

Comments

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    BrianTheScrewDriver
    434 Driver Driver
     2 years ago

    I've been driving rideshares for like 5 years and no, I never knew this existed.

    I appreciate you recommending this to us, but if the police aren't paying attention, it means nothing, right?  If I lived in NYC where I am sure the officers are trained, that's one thing.  but I am sure that isn't the case everywhere.

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      DimSumUng
      127
       2 years ago

      Right, not to mention it's on a Toyota Camry, and not on a taxicab.

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      StevenL-NYU
      OP 141 Driver Driver
       2 years ago

      Actually, this concept is used widely and internationally.  Police officers are definitely trained to look out for those.

      Also, remember, it's a flashing light.  It definitely will stand out; definitely enough to make you go, "huh?  there's something weird going on."

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      Bigfrank
      431 Driver Driver Rider
       1 year ago

      Most cops today cannot find a pair of tits in a strip joint and this is the result of lowering the standards for jerk offs who do not deserve that job.

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    CaptainOlimar
    186
     2 years ago

    No, I had no idea.  and if I didn't know, how can it help.  That'd be so sad if a cabbie is calling for help but people just finds it cute and keeps walking.

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      lguirch
      79 Driver
       2 years ago

      With Taxis I think the driver is in more danger as robbers may potentially think they carry cash.

      A cab can be ordered through a payphone.

      Uber/Lyft are ordered through a phone using an account and tied to a credit card, plus it is a cashless system.

      Other than a few idiots that harmed rideshare drivers in recent past: a dumb girl who stole a machete in Walmart and stabbed a driver, and idiot (ex taxi company owner or taxi driver) that bought a gun, ordered an Uber through his phone and then shot and killed his driver while stopped at the light, such incidents are not frequent. I suspect rideshare driver job is not nearly as dangerous as taxi drivers.

      Dashcam is also a good deterrent

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        DaimsLer
        264
         2 years ago

        These are great points.  Remember that being a taxi driver used to be ranked as one of the most dangerous jobs?

        I agree the ride share job must not be close to this stats 

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        srider78
        92
         2 years ago

        UberEats drivers are always in danger because they are carying food.  I am being serious btw.  I've heard that in college towns, the deliverers have to be careful and have to check IDs, because people were stealing pizzas from their fellow students.

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        CaptainOlimar
        186
         2 years ago

        I didn't think of the cashless experience being a safety mechanism for drivers.  Great point. 

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      StevenL-NYU
      OP 141 Driver Driver
       2 years ago

      No, it isn't so much to alert the passerbys.  It's to alert the police officers and police cruisers that are driving by.  They are trained to respond to those.

      They even have a procedure, where they may pull over the car and at first pretend that nothing is wrong.  Then they would control the situation (say, make the driver get out of the car AND Then question the passenger (possibly a robber).

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      FitBitMeIn
      136
       2 years ago

      Well, New Yorkers will keep walking even if they knew, but...yeah, sad either way.

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    ShadyPeteMD
    180 Driver
     2 years ago

    Uber has one on the phone now, right?

    There's nothing silent or secretive about it though.  My phone is on the dash where my riders (the attacker) can see!

    and Honestly, I don't know if I will ever have the chance to tap-tap-tap to reach the exact button in a case of an emergency.   

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      RedANT
      1075 Rider Driver
       2 years ago

      There's an easier way...  it's the old fashioned 9-1-1 that has been around for years.  It's easy to remember no special sequence or confirmations, and fewer (and less confusing) steps. 

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        ShadyPeteMD
        180 Driver
         2 years ago

        I actually wondered the same thing. I'm thinking this "technology" has been around since before cell phones were popular. 

        The only other use case I can see is if the driver is being held hostage and had the phone taken away.  I guess. 

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    Bigfrank
    431 Driver Driver Rider
     1 year ago

    Seriously the NYPD will come to your aid when that stupid light is flashing ???  Hello drivers carry your own protection as I do because I am not going down for penny wages. 

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    Bigfrank
    431 Driver Driver Rider
     1 year ago

    Do you know that cops hate us and that trouble light means Jack nothing to them. I carry LIQUID ASS and that's my trouble light.