×
Post New Topic

As a driver and a person who knows what they go through, what do you think justifies a less than 5 star rating for another driver?

{{ ratingSum }}
fpressly
4086 Rider Driver
 Posted 4 years, 3 months ago

Hmmm… First and foremost it is a big leap from what some of these other answers have suggested (about being provably intoxicated, sexual harassment or physical assault) and giving someone less than five stars. To heck with the stars, if a driver commits any of these acts you first contact the authorities and then Uber/Lyft. Drivers commiting these acts should not be driving.

As I have suggested before, this whole ratings thing is BS as far as I am concerned. It is so completely subjective and should have nothing to do with if the driver provided snacks, water and amenities. This is a $5 ride not a $2000 airline ticket. I have amenities; but, they are things with little to no cost. An aux cable, cellphone charging cords, barf bags, peppermint hard candy, a good selection of music, Purell and some free tourist brochures from the Chamber of Commerce. We barely make ends meet, much less to be serving water, snacks or a meat and three vegetables. An enterprising driver may SELL water and snacks. Keeping water cold and snacks fresh, PLUS the room it takes up in your vehicle... that's a toss up as to if it's even worth it. Bottom line is, NONE OF THIS should have anything to do with the star ratings. This is all showmanship and entertainment. Getting you from A to B promptly and safely is all that should count.

Otherwise, rating a driver should be about cleanliness and presentability (is their car AT LEAST as clean as your car at home is) and decorum (are they polite, helpful and do they show a little pride in their purpose), how safely they drive (do they reasonably follow the traffic laws - remember no one is perfect and driving has as much to do with the car…

Read more...

Hmmm… First and foremost it is a big leap from what some of these other answers have suggested (about being provably intoxicated, sexual harassment or physical assault) and giving someone less than five stars. To heck with the stars, if a driver commits any of these acts you first contact the authorities and then Uber/Lyft. Drivers commiting these acts should not be driving.

As I have suggested before, this whole ratings thing is BS as far as I am concerned. It is so completely subjective and should have nothing to do with if the driver provided snacks, water and amenities. This is a $5 ride not a $2000 airline ticket. I have amenities; but, they are things with little to no cost. An aux cable, cellphone charging cords, barf bags, peppermint hard candy, a good selection of music, Purell and some free tourist brochures from the Chamber of Commerce. We barely make ends meet, much less to be serving water, snacks or a meat and three vegetables. An enterprising driver may SELL water and snacks. Keeping water cold and snacks fresh, PLUS the room it takes up in your vehicle... that's a toss up as to if it's even worth it. Bottom line is, NONE OF THIS should have anything to do with the star ratings. This is all showmanship and entertainment. Getting you from A to B promptly and safely is all that should count.

Otherwise, rating a driver should be about cleanliness and presentability (is their car AT LEAST as clean as your car at home is) and decorum (are they polite, helpful and do they show a little pride in their purpose), how safely they drive (do they reasonably follow the traffic laws - remember no one is perfect and driving has as much to do with the cars around you as your own actions - if you have to swerve, make an abrupt lane change or hard brake to avoid another car that is not your bad (it's called defensive driving) - whereas some riders see that as a safety ding). That’s about it. Expecting someone to have a bubbly demeanor and a perfect car after a 10-12 hour shift is unrealistic and unreasonable.

I still believe they should replace/supplement this 5 star business with a simple one question survey. I WOULD/WOULD NOT ride with this driver again. The computer can do the rest in keeping track and separating rider and driver. Keeping the two (driver/rider) separated might be the best thing for everyone. Some people just don't get along for whatever reason. If a driver gets enough WOULD NOTs, through lack of business they will eventually go broke and die off from attrition. Let the five star system be informational and the WOULD/WOULD NOT survey kill off the bad eggs.

You have too many riders trying to scam free rides, taking out their daily angst on a driver, or they themselves are intoxicated or high and looking for a beef wherever they can find it. Uber and Lyft put far more weight on this ratings business than the riders probably realize. There are people who would NEVER give someone a five out of five about anything, because they believe nothing is perfect and it doesn’t take too many four stars to put a driver in range of danger of being removed from the platform. In the real world and on the rest of the planet a 4.6/5 (92 percentile) is GOOD/EXCELLENT. With Uber it is your pink slip. They expect Black car service from the Hyundai-Kia crowd (well really everyone).Thanks for your upvote.

Read less...

Comments

    {{ ratingSum }}
    fpressly
    OP 4086 Rider Driver
     4 years ago  (edited 4 years ago)

    With Uber, your rating is based on the previous 500 ratings. Most people do not realize how powerfully a low rating affects your average. If 9% of your riders give you a 1 star rating (that like 1 out of 11) it will drop you to the dread 4.6 star rating (the disconnect rating for Uber). If 200 (40%) of your 500 ratings are 4 star it drops you again to the 4.6 average. Why Uber has their disconnect set at such a high average I have no idea. Anywhere else in society (school, work, sports) a 4.6 (92%) is excellent and it takes a 3.5 or below to constitute failure. Drivers are subject to the whim of the public which is wrong, wrong, wrong.

    I really believe this is spillover from Uber origination (which was the Black car service @$100/hr) where excellence and professionalism is expected. Holding Joe Blow @$3-$5/hr, driving a hooptie, to the same standards is ridiculous. Green drivers go to great lengths with snacks and amenities etc. to pursue those 5 star ratings at a cost they do not re…

    Read more...

    With Uber, your rating is based on the previous 500 ratings. Most people do not realize how powerfully a low rating affects your average. If 9% of your riders give you a 1 star rating (that like 1 out of 11) it will drop you to the dread 4.6 star rating (the disconnect rating for Uber). If 200 (40%) of your 500 ratings are 4 star it drops you again to the 4.6 average. Why Uber has their disconnect set at such a high average I have no idea. Anywhere else in society (school, work, sports) a 4.6 (92%) is excellent and it takes a 3.5 or below to constitute failure. Drivers are subject to the whim of the public which is wrong, wrong, wrong.

    I really believe this is spillover from Uber origination (which was the Black car service @$100/hr) where excellence and professionalism is expected. Holding Joe Blow @$3-$5/hr, driving a hooptie, to the same standards is ridiculous. Green drivers go to great lengths with snacks and amenities etc. to pursue those 5 star ratings at a cost they do not realize. A water and a pack of crackers/nuts will eat up half your profit for a less than 5 mile ride. 

    This rating system is best described as a non-zero-sum game. Cooperation is usually analysed in game theory by means of a theory called the "Prisoner's Dilemma" (Axelrod, 1984). The two players in the game can choose between two moves, either "cooperate" or "defect". The idea is that each player gains when both cooperate, but if only one of them cooperates, the other one, who defects, will gain more. If both defect, both lose (or gain very little) but not as much as the "cheated" cooperator whose cooperation is not returned. If rider and driver collaborate and give each other 5 stars, everyone is happy. If the rider "defects" and gives the driver a 1 star rating to get back at them or to try and scam a free ride they are cheating the driver and the purpose of the system. If the driver in turn gives the rider a 1 star rating to get back at behavioral issues, they are also cheating the system of clientele. If both rate each other 1 star. Nobody wins. Thank you for your upvote.

    Read less...

    {{ ratingSum }}
    RedANT
    1072 Rider Driver
     4 years ago

    I won't comment, because ANY comment can (and will) be construed by riders here as a valid reason to ding the rating of a driver.  "That driver on Rideguru said they would give his a 1 star rating." 

    Each driver needs to be judged individually, since we all drive throrugh such drastically different scenarios.

    Show Hide  1 Reply
      {{ ratingSum }}
      fpressly
      OP 4086 Rider Driver
       4 years ago

      I don't believe in giving anyone a 1-star rating. If I were not happy for any reason I would give no rating at all, talk with the driver about my concerns and if I am not comfortable doing that I leave a comment in the written comment section. This informs the driver without affecting their score or their livelihood. You don't drive as RedAnt do you?

    {{ ratingSum }}
    AsStibelDude
    668 Driver
     4 years ago

    I of course strive to get 100% 5-stars, but I also try to look at it from a user's perspective where they should be critical if the ride doesn't perfectly go smoothly.  If all drivers got 5-stars for all rides, then there won't be anything to differentiate the good drivers from the crappy drivers. As a person who prides in providing good service, I'd like to make sure my rating is higher than others.

    I can argue about the current inflated star ratings all day.  I am in the camp of having riders be more critical of their ratings and don't be shy about giving away 3 and 4 stars to be honest.

    Now, that's all idealism.  We won't solve that today.  At the current state what would be fair for a less than 5-stars?  Besides the blatant things like the driver being racist or smoking or something?

    What I think deserves non 5-star ratings?

    - Taking wrong turns, missing highway exits, because I wasn't paying attention?

    - Getting into an accident while being at fault.…

    Read more...

    I of course strive to get 100% 5-stars, but I also try to look at it from a user's perspective where they should be critical if the ride doesn't perfectly go smoothly.  If all drivers got 5-stars for all rides, then there won't be anything to differentiate the good drivers from the crappy drivers. As a person who prides in providing good service, I'd like to make sure my rating is higher than others.

    I can argue about the current inflated star ratings all day.  I am in the camp of having riders be more critical of their ratings and don't be shy about giving away 3 and 4 stars to be honest.

    Now, that's all idealism.  We won't solve that today.  At the current state what would be fair for a less than 5-stars?  Besides the blatant things like the driver being racist or smoking or something?

    What I think deserves non 5-star ratings?

    - Taking wrong turns, missing highway exits, because I wasn't paying attention?

    - Getting into an accident while being at fault.  Causing delay for the customer.

    What I don't think deserves non 5-star ratings?

    - Things that were outside of the driver's control.

    - Accidents that wasn't the driver's fault.

    - Unease or uncomfortable something, say weather, that is outside of driver's control.

    - Things around customer preference that could have been fixed only if the user spoke up.  (e.g. please close windows, the radio is too loud, the A/C is too cold, i prefer to sleep)

    Read less...