Frank Pressly (fpressly)

Ride Apprentice from Greenville, SC

Video te ego audiam vos ego sentio tibi. - Cat herder - Uber/Lyft 3000 rides
2154 Rider Driver

I have been a ride share driver for almost three years. While I like the ride share concept, I truly hate it's implementation and the way Uber and Lyft have so little regard for their work force. I am for the little guy. I seek to right injustice and speak for those who cannot speak for themselves. It's usually the ones you find hardest to love that need it the most. Please enjoy my opinion and if you like (or even if you just welcome the effort), an upvote is a digital pat on the back and is most appreciated. I invite you to read my other comments and upvote them as well. Thanks

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Posts by fpressly

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Comments by fpressly

  • I don't know about meds. I imagine they can get stale and lose their potency over time. Since it is something you are ingesting into your body I would think it prudent to find out for sure. An ink cartridge either works or it doesn't. No physical harm either way.


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     1 month ago in  What do you do with your time while you wait for the ping?

    Surprisingly people don’t carry what they need for a tire change. A tire to begin with, one that’s not flat. A jack (with the necessary components to make it all work) and a four way tire iron. It never hurts to know where to mount the jack. Parents should take their kids on a dry run and let them practice so when they encounter this on the road they won’t be helpless.


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     1 month ago in  What is the meaning of ‘out for delivery'?

    Delivery services are bound by a lot of rules. Sometimes addressing anomalies and acceptance requirements not being met necessitate the return of the item to the hub for reprocessing. It will usually come corrected the next day or at least an explanation.


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     1 month ago in  What is the meaning of ‘out for delivery'?

    It could be that as well. In fact it could apply to any delivery situation where the driver is on his “last mile” of delivery.


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     1 month ago in  What do you do with your time while you wait for the ping?

    A driver is notified of a riders request for a ride with a very distinctive sound from the app. It is referred to as “the ping”.


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     1 month ago in  What do you do with your time while you wait for the ping?

    I really enjoy the lost art of reading as well. I like you, didn't have the opportunity to sit and read for many decades. Now I find turning the pages of a book to be somewhat therapeutic. Turning pages is progress by any measure. I have a relationship with a used book store where I trade in read books and get new. Technical and business, computer/cellphone screens are fine. A good novel, give me the real deal.


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     1 month ago in  Can I use Uber or Lyft using my iPad or other tablets?

    Apple has announced the hardware support list for iOS 10, the next version of its smartphone and tablet OS that will be released in beta form soon and in final form later this year. After a surprising stay of execution last year, it looks like Apple is set to stop providing updates for a fair handful of older devices: the iPhone 4S, the iPad 2, the original iPad Mini, the 3rd-generation iPad, and the fifth-generation iPod Touch.

    Here's the full list of supported hardware:

    • iPhone 5, 5C, 5S, 6, 6 Plus, 6S, 6S Plus, and SE.
    • iPad 4, iPad Air, and iPad Air 2.
    • Both iPad Pros.
    • iPad Mini 2 and newer.
    • Sixth-generation iPod Touch.


    All the dropped devices have something in common: some version of the Apple A5 SoC. The A5 has been actively supported for longer than any of Apple's other chips to date; it was originally included in the iPad 2 in March of 2011, the last hardware launched by Steve Jobs before he passed away in October of that year. It later made its way into the iPhone 4S, and it was added to the fifth-generation iPod Touch and the iPad Mini in 2012. The first Retina iPad used a faster A5X variant, and the the third-generation Apple TV used a version with a single CPU core (Apple dropped support for that Apple TV box last year).

    Recent iOS updates have made the A5 feel its age and there was a substantial number of features in iOS 7, 8, and 9 that these gadgets couldn't handle, but that's an unheard of level of support in the fast-moving mobile industry no matter what platform you're talking about.

    The Apple A6 family in the iPhone 5 and 5C and iPad 4 are the last supported 32-bit SoCs in the iPhone and iPad ecosystem. Presumably iOS 11 will be the first to be all-64-bit across all hardware and devices.


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     1 month ago in  Why does Uber not always send the closest driver?

    While all of those are great reasons why you may experience various app failures, all of you are missing the most obvious and it happens to me every day. I think now it has improved because the app now tells the waiting passenger that the driver is finishing up another ride and will be with you shortly. Used to be the app would give you another ride while this one was finishing up. It would in effect stack riders. A waiting rider would see the driver moving away from them (which may be necessary to drop off the last rider). After that dropoff, then the driver would flip back to pick up the current ride and they may in fact be the closest driver. Well people with their impatience, would see the movement of the car and cancel because they think the driver is lost or not coming.

    Also there can be a lag in the display of vehicle locations. If the car jumps 20 city blocks in a second then you can believe the graphic has just updated and no not that the car has actually flown 20 blocks. LOL Where the driver icon was was where he was ten minutes ago and GPS issues or app issues have just caused a delay in posting movement real time.


  • However, one caveat. You may only deduct the amount of the lease that is equivalent to the amount of miles/time the leased vehicle was actually used for ride share. You can break that down by one of two ways. Percent of mileage work/personal. Or length of time spent Uber/Lyft vs. personal. If you are out ride sharing, the number of hours you spend vs. the amount of time you make personal runs to the doctor or grocery shopping. The only way the lease is 100% deductible is if you use the vehicle for nothing else and it is parked when not ride sharing.


  • Uber rolls over people. When you are worth $72 billion you can do that. Trying to out litigate them, is a guaranteed trip to the poor house. You are better off organizing and harnessing the work force with a powerful digital solution and negotiate change.


  • I disagree with the majority here. In my opinion, WHO is able to use the ride share platform is ultimately up to the ride share company. How well they vette their drivers is ultimately up to them and they therefore are responsible/liable for selecting poor/incompetent drivers. How qualified/skillful someone is as a driver, their mental state, whether they have the correct insurance and whether vehicle is safe are a myriad of factors that a ride share driver should be denied access to the platform for. Any good lawyer could make hay with just one of those arguments. The fact that someone is not an employee, is just one facet of this gem. In an accident involving a ride share situation, the fact that the driver is a driver, the rider is a rider, the vehicle is in use for this purpose and the fact that all these factors come into play at one time are all things entirely controlled and made to come about by the ride share company. We could not be in this situation, at this moment in time, without the ride share company's ultimate control and participation. The ride share driver may not technically be an employee and the ride share not an employer; but, they are undeniably in a partnership in this enterprise.

    In legal situations partners are liable. Especially if they are in the drivers seat of the partnership. Of course all of this only matters if the ride share driver is found to be the at fault driver. Otherwise both driver and rider would look to the other drivers insurance to make them whole. If the ride share driver is at fault, he could well argue he was distracted by the rider. This is where a dashcam is invaluable.


  • I drive for both Uber and Lyft. The issue of tips has been a sore spot for years. Before Uber began tinkering with the fares and reducing drivers income, tips were not that big a deal as good money was being made by all. When Lyft included tipping in their app, I thought that would improve the picture. However, to the contrary, I have learned that when a rider is not on the carpet as far as giving the driver a tip (cash hand to hand), that they will not tip. After Uber began messing with the fares and significantly impacting the bottom line, they also decided to add tipping to their app.

    I do not have tip boxes as they tend to look a little crude and presumptive. However, I do have a small sign on the back of the seats that say, "Tipping is an act of appreciation for a service well rendered." Telling them WHY they should tip, puts the ball in their court. It is then up to them if they think the service was well rendered and if they appreciated it. Cash tips allow the driver to take that into consideration before they rate their rider.


  • Early in my career with ride share, I was on wait time at a pickup one evening on the Southeast side of Greenville. I was driving my other ride share vehicle which is a BMW 328i. I normally drive UberSelect; but, was trying to pick up some extra rides taking UberX calls. This was a part of the city I don’t frequent often on my uptown/downtown/airport routes. I had just arrived at the pin and it was not looking good. The housing was tenement style, four room apartments with a chair or bench on the front porch. A slender Black girl in a KFC uniform waved out a screen door of apartment 3D and shouted “I’m coming.” 

    Three doors down a boy and two little girls came outside to play beside my car. The young boy had to be about eight or nine and the girls five or six years old. The boy was unceremoniously dragging a small puppy behind him. He had his thumb in the puppy’s eye socket and with the rest of his fingers had it by the ears dragging the poor animal down the stairs. The poor puppy look dazed and scrawny. With an enormous potbelly it appeared to have worms. The boy squatted on the side walk with his foot across the puppy’s throat and began hitting the puppy’s underbelly with a stick. The little girls squealed with laughter and clapped their hands. With the gleeful attention, the little boy went one step further and began shoving the stick up the puppy’s rectum. The puppy squalled and I had seen enough. I leaned on my horn to get their attention, made eye contact, shook my head and mouthed the word “no”. The boy leered back defiantly at me; but, removed the stick from the puppy’s behind. I turned my attention to texting the rider to hurry up. When I looked back over at the children, I was shocked at what I saw. 

    The boy had gotten a can of spray paint and with a lighter in one hand was spraying the puppy with what amounted to a blow torch. Clearly the paint had an oil base and was highly flammable. He liberally sprayed the burning paint all over the underside of the puppy. The paint stuck to the burned hair and flesh and continued to burn even after the lighter went out. The puppy was screaming and crying in pain. The little girls just thought this was the most wonderful entertainment they had ever seen. I have a soft spot for animals and I was about to blow a gasket. I jumped out and rounded the front of the car ready to slap that kid silly. Realizing I was in a neighborhood that would not sympathize with a stranger smacking one of their kids around, my better sense got a hold of me and I walked over, pushed the kid aside and grabbed up the puppy. I bundled it into me to put out the flames and gently carried it around to the driver’s seat. My rider had still not appeared. 

    Slipping the car into gear with my left hand and driving with my knee, I cradled the puppy while I called the rider and told them I was canceling. I took off for the closest animal urgent care I could think of and arrived in record time. The little puppy was still whimpering in pain, so I quickly handed it off to the vet tech to hopefully get it some pain meds as soon as possible. After about an hour the vet came out and told me the puppy was sleeping comfortably on some pain meds; but, that they were going to keep her a few days so the burns could get scabbed up and would not get infected. I asked if she was otherwise okay. He said other than being malnourished and a little wormy, she would survive the burns. 

    Five days later I went to pick up the puppy. She cowered at the back of the cage, head down, eyes sad and clearly in need of some TLC. I sat down by the cage and just sat there, letting it get comfortable with me. After a while, I slipped my hand in the cage and gently stroked her head and spoke softly to the little thing. I was rewarded with a lick and an ever so slight wag of its tail. I wanted to pick her up and hug her; but, the vet tech said the burns were still sensitive and brought out a basket to put her in. She went home with me that night. 

    Over the weeks and months that followed, Lady recovered from the burns and maltreatment. She grew into a 100 pound Shar-pei Labrador mix. She was incredibly gentle with children, mothered baby chicks and goslings; but, could scare the pants off someone with a bark and vicious looking growl. She was my baby, my child. We went everywhere together. Inseparable.

     One day, she was with me as I fought early morning traffic going through Williamston. I had a seizure and passed out. When I woke up, I was in the hospital. I had a head on collision with another car and had broken a hip, left leg, five ribs, cracked my shoulder blade and suffered a concussion. When my girlfriend came in, I asked her about my dog. With sorrow in her eyes she explained that due to internal injuries from the accident, that she had not made it. I cried. RIP my Lady.


  • A car herder is one who has to challenge improbability for authenticity. N-o-o-o-t impossibility, improbability.


  • Hmmm... I don't think I have ever had someone call an act of kindness "creepy". I pick up men and women equally. You aren't much of one for exaggeration are you? "Riding all over offering people free rides"? Matter of fact, I have never had anyone call the police. When you see someone walking down the highway in a very remote rural area, it usually means they are in trouble and trying desperately to get somewhere. If I am going that way anyway, what is the harm in asking if you can help? I think you have issues that need professional attention!


  • Uhm, uh sorry. It's "an" UBER priest. The rules say that if the following word begins with a vowel you must use "an". If the following word begins with a consonant then "a" is correct. With UBER the "U" is a vowel. Therefore, "an UBER priest"... oh so dandy, would be correct.!!


  • The week of 4th of July last year (2017).


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     3 months ago in  What do they not tell you about being a Uber/Lyft driver?

    Uber support is dismal. It is a hoax on the drivers of whom 99.99% are hard working, dedicated individuals. Trying to make it in America. Uber would rather spend money on AI and driverless cars than a healthy workforce. Uber is for Uber. If you are of no further value or more trouble than you are worth, you are milk toast.


  • If passengers can have service animals then aesthetically, if done right, a driver should be able to have a service animal on board. Legally there is no question, if that animal is your service animal, God can't wrest it from you. And if a passenger gives you bad vibe or bad ratings because of that, they are suable (if you have to or want to make that big an issue of it.) I would also post a note in the vehicle.

           NOTICE: This animal is my service animal and we are protected under these laws.

    • Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (also known as the Rehab Act)
      29 U.S.C. § 794,  over 20 implementing regulations including 34 CFR Part 104 (Department of Education), 45 CFR Part 84 (Department of Health and Human Services), 28 CFR §§ 42.501 et seq.; over 95 implementing regulations for federally conducted programs including:  28 CFR Part 39 (Department of Justice).
    • Air Carrier Access Act  (ACAA) of 1986
      49 U.S.C. § 41705, 14 CFR Part 382
    • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008*
      42 U.S.C. § 12101 et seq., Implementing regulations: 29 CFR Parts 1630, 1602 (Title I, EEOC), 28 CFR Part 35 (Title II, Department of Justice), 49 CFR Parts 27, 37, 38 (Title II, III, Department of Transportation), 28 CFR Part 36 (Title III, Department of Justice) and 47 CFR §§ 64.601 et seq. (Title IV, FCC)

          Thank you for understanding.

    If anyone wants to get topsy-turvy after you've told them all that. End the ride and put them out and send a message to Uber about the rider violating the service animal laws. Thanks for your upvote.



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Featured Answers by fpressly

  • I disagree with the majority here. In my opinion, WHO is able to use the ride share platform is ultimately up to the ride share company. How well they vette their drivers is ultimately up to them and they therefore are responsible/liable for selecting poor/incompetent drivers. How qualified/skillful someone is as a driver, their mental state, whether they have the correct insurance and whether vehicle is safe are a myriad of factors that a ride share driver should be denied access to the platform for. Any good lawyer could make hay with just one of those arguments. The fact that someone is not an employee, is just one facet of this gem. In an accident involving a ride share situation, the fact that the driver is a driver, the rider is a rider, the vehicle is in use for this purpose and the fact that all these factors come into play at one time are all things entirely controlled and made to come about by the ride share company. We could not be in this situation, at this moment in time, without the ride share company's ultimate control and participation. The ride share driver may not technically be an employee and the ride share not an employer; but, they are undeniably in a partnership in this enterprise.

    In legal situations partners are liable. Especially if they are in the drivers seat of the partnership. Of course all of this only matters if the ride share driver is found to be the at fault driver. Otherwise both driver and rider would look to the other drivers insurance to make them whole. If the ride share driver is at fault, he could well argue he was distracted by the rider. This is where a dashcam is invaluable.